Induction Chemotherapy with Docetaxel, Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil (TPF) Followed by Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Can It Achieve Its Potential?

Induction Chemotherapy with Docetaxel, Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil (TPF) Followed by Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Can It Achieve Its Potential?

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Nicholas P Rowell
Consultant in Clinical Oncology, Kent Oncology Centre, Maidstone Hospital, Maidstone, UK

A B S T R A C T

Objective: In view of concerns about toxicity and deliverability of induction chemotherapy and its impact on subsequent chemoradiotherapy, a retrospective review was carried out with patients treated for locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC) in a single centre between 2007-2017. Patients and Interventions: Patients with LAHNC and good performance status receiving induction chemotherapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) followed by chemoradiotherapy to 70Gy in 35 daily fractions with platinum-based chemotherapy. Main Outcome Measures: Overall and cause-specific survival, rates of locoregional recurrence or distant metastasis, treatment-related toxicity. Results: One hundred and eight patients with LAHNC were treated with 1-4 cycles of TPF (95 receiving two cycles) followed by chemoradiotherapy. The mean delivered dose intensity was 97.6% for all TPF cycles. Median interval from the start of the final cycle of TPF to the start of radiotherapy was 24 days, with 92/103 (89%) starting radiotherapy within 28 days. Median radiation treatment time was 47 days. The mean delivered dose intensity for chemotherapy delivered concurrently with radiotherapy was 97%. There were significantly fewer dose reductions in those receiving platinum/5FU combinations than platinum only regimes (P < 0.0001). For those receiving two cycles of TPF, 90% of patients completed the whole course of treatment within 14 weeks (median overall treatment time 13.1 weeks). There were four treatment-related deaths during induction chemotherapy and none during radiotherapy. Twenty-five developed locoregional failure and 13 distant metastases (both in eight). Actuarial overall survival was 60.7% at five years, with progression-free survival of 77.9% at two years and 74.1% at five years. For oropharynx cancers, overall survival was 70.4% and progression-free survival 80.8% at five years. Conclusion: Although significant toxicity from TPF was observed, with appropriate support, it is possible to complete treatment without undue compromise of subsequent treatment.

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Article Type
Research Article
Publication history
Received: Wed 26, Aug 2020
Accepted: Wed 09, Sep 2020
Published: Mon 28, Sep 2020
Copyright
© 2021 Nicholas P Rowell. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Hosting by Science Repository.
DOI: 10.31487/j.ACO.2020.02.04